So goes the question posed by The Atlantic.


A recent column by Emily Esfahani Smith looked at a number of factors and concluded that it’s definitely not always the case.


Student-produced plays at Bowdoin College shown to incoming students to foster healthy relationships are based on real-life experiences but often look more like episodes of Girls than they do steamy Hollywood sex scenes.


Smith argues that students and young people in general have lost the eroticism in sex. She thinks students should be looking to Eros - in other words, the beating heart of life - more for inspiration than awkward encounters of 20-somethings.Without eroticism, not only does sex lose its depth and meaning, but life itself does.


Smith says:


"Casual sex, readily available sex, publicized sex, sloppy drunk sex, sex for the sake of self-gratification and self-discovery—this is not eros. "Sex-on-tap," Nehring writes in A Vindication of Love, "attenuates rather than inflames passion. It is for this reason that the relentless emphasis on sexual climax that distinguishes our day from most others in historical memory has a largely depleting effect on the life of the emotions... The natural distances between people have been diminished so radically as to make romance—which depends on the retention of other-ness, tensions, and reserve—impossible."


"If we want sex to be sexy again, perhaps we should speak less about it."


Interesting take on a culture we see as too sexed up.


The Atlantic kept up with the on-topic material this week and also published “The Ethics of Extreme Porn.”