As you’re probably already aware, the porn industry has been majorly overhauled since the early days of big-boobed blondes and high heels from the 70s and 80s.

 

Obviously the Internet and accessibility such as home entertainment systems have played a large part in the expansion of porn, but the rise of alternative and niche porn has also mainstreamed, and simultaneously sent parts of the industry underground.

 

The Next Web profiles the increase in porn proliferation that also happens to correspond with the rise of alternative channels of production and subject matter. Writer Lauren  Hockenson uses now-powerhouse of untraditional beauties Suicide Girls as the seminal example of a niche company that finds its market and flourishes. Suicide Girls has gone from home operation to big business over the last ten years.

 

Also noted is Kink.com, which goes as far as to include a “Model’s Bill of Rights” ensuring that all models are there on their own volition and are enjoying the acts.

 

“The whole time it’s so apparent that the girls are so into it,” says Karley Sciortino, writer and creator of sex and erotica blog Slutever. “The porn stars talk about the experience and they always say they have the most amazing time during it and they orgasm during it. That’s the kind of BDSM porn I want to see.”

 

And according to the article, and pretty much any person you ever talk to, that’s the kind of porn everyone wants to see. Enjoyable, mutual acts played out in front of them.

 

Further on, Hockenson references other sites such as X-Art.com and the influx of amateur “hub” sites receiving extraordinary amounts of traffic.

 

Really what it boils down to is people have been ready for consensual, loving, non-mass produced pornography and are embracing the fact that it is finally very easily available.